OTHER PREFERRED METHODS OF COOKING.

OTHER PREFERRED METHODS OF COOKING.
In India, there is a tradition of cooking foods with a lot of oil which is to be avoided by a heart patient. So, our methods of cooking are:

Roasting: Roasting and baking are essentially the same. They are carried out in an oven between temperatures of 120 c and 260 C. Generally, the term roasting is applied to papad while baking is used for bread, cakes, and biscuits. The food is cooked partially by dry heat and partially by moist heat if the food is high in moisture content. In baking, the oven atmosphere should be moist initially so that the moisture condenses on the cold dough. This helps in heat transfer and plays a part in the formation of the crust. Roasting and baking involve heat transfer from the heat source in the oven by radiation, conduction, and convection. Heat is transferred directly on to the container of the food through which it is conducted to the food. Convection currents of air help keep the temperature of the oven fairly uniform. This process has an advantage that it does not involve oil and the most important thing is that the food is cooked properly with plenty of taste.

Boiling: Boiling involves cooking in water. In this the medium transferring heat is water. Water receives heat by conduction through the sides of the utensils in which the food is cooked and passes on the heat by convection currents, which equalize the temperature and become very vigorous when boiling commences. Water is a poor conductor of heat and its heat capacity is high i.e. It requires more heat than any other liquid of the same weight to raise the temperature. The boiling point of water is 100 C and it is altered at high altitudes and in presence of electrolytes.

Steaming: Steam is the medium of cooking in steam, “waterless” cooking and pressure- cooking. Cooking by these methods involves moist heat. In steaming, food is cooked by steam from added water, whilst in waterless cooking, the steam originates from the food itself. Pressure so that the boiling point of water automatically pressures, it boils at 121 C at a pressure of 1.07 kg/cm2 which is the pressure at which food is cooked in a kitchen pressure cooker. In cooking by steam, the food is heated as a result of steam condensing on the food, and the release of the large quantity of heat contained in the steam. This continues until the heated food reaches the same temperature as steam.