Anatomy of the Coronary Artery

 

Anatomy of the Coronary Artery

When the heart supplies the blood to the aorta(the main artery for the body) it retains two branches for its own supply. The muscles of the heart which have to contract continuously obviously need a continuous supply of blood. This blood brings nutrients and oxygen, which gives it power in the form of calories.

These tubes are called coronary tubes because when they divide and re-divide, they look like a crown on the head of a king. There are two main tubes that form this crown or corona.

Out of the two, one is on the right side, called the Right Coronary Artery or RCA which has a diameter of 5 mm. it gives off a series of branches as it goes down and circles around the right side of the heart and proceeds as the PDA. The tube can be divided into three parts – the proximal third, the middle third and the distal third.

The branch to the heart on the left is called the Left Main (LM) which immediately divides into two branches.

The first branch, the Left Anterior Descending (LAD), is so named as it supplies to the front of the heart and goes down. It supplies the blood through numerous branches to the heart muscles. It gives off some branches towards the right called the septal branches and some of the left direction called the diagonal branches. For the purpose of easy description, this artery (LAD) can also be divided into three parts – the proximal third, the middle third and the distal third. The LAD is bigger than the RCA in size and is more important as it supplies the main part of the chamber four or left ventricle.

The second branch on the left side of the heart is called the Left Circumflex (LCx) as it circles down the circumference of the heart on the left side. This is a little smaller than the RCA in size.

The circumflex artery gives off branches to supply all the areas in the back of the left side of the heart. Some of the branches of this tube are called Obtuse Marginal and are referred to as OM1, OM2, OM3 and so on.